The 1947 Japanese House of Councillors election

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The 23rd general elections of members of the House of Representatives (第23回衆議院議員総選挙, dai-nijūsankai Shūgiin giin sō-senkyo), the lower house of the National Diet of Japan, were held on 25 April The Japan Socialist Party won of the seats, making it the largest party in the House of Representatives following the election.

House of Councillors elections were held in Japan on 20 April The Japan Socialist Party won more seats than any other party, although independents emerged as the largest group in the House.

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Most independents joined the Ryokufūkai parliamentary group in the first Diet session making it the largest group, and Ryokufūkai member Tsuneo Matsudaira was elected the first president of the.

Possibly most important of all, the Japanese voting public once again behaved in a shrewd and sophisticated fashion. This election, after all, was for one-half of the members of the House of Councillors, the "second" chamber in the National Assembly (Diet), which remains far less powerful than the House of Representatives.

Latest election. See Japanese House of Councillors election; Historical notes. Article of the Japanese Constitution provided that half of the councillors elected in the first House of Councillors election in would be up for re-election three years later in order to introduce staggered six-year terms.

The House initially had election: 21 July For a list of individual members, see the List of members of the Diet of Japan. Latest election. See Japanese House of Councillors election; Historical notes.

Article of the Japanese Constitution provided that half of the councillors elected in the first House of Councillors election in would be up for re-election three years later in order to introduce staggered six-year terms. The electoral cycles of the two chambers of the Diet are usually not synchronized.

Even when the current constitution took effect inthe first House of Councillors election was held several days apart from the 23rd House of Representatives in andgeneral and regular election coincided on the same day because the House of Representatives was dissolved in time for.

Talk Japanese House of Councillors election Jump to This article is within the scope of WikiProject Elections and Referendums, an ongoing effort to improve the quality of, Current time in Japan:September 7, (JST, Reiwa 1).

Resolution on Japan’s Development Policy in the Lead-up to the G20 Summit in Osaka and TICAD 7 and International Activities of the House of Councillors(PDF file) organization, and function of the House of Councillors.

Diet-related Laws. Articles of Constitution, Diet Law, and Rules of the House of Councillors. Information. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Japanese House of Councillors elections.: Pages in category "House of Councillors (Japan) elections" The. House of Councillors Electoral Constituencies: • Directly elected ( seats): 47 multi-member constituencies (of seats) formed on a metropolitan or prefectural basis.

• Proportional representation (96 seats): One at-large constituency. English: 20 April Japanese House of Councillors election results. LEGEND - Japan Liberal Party - Japan Socialist Party - Democratic Party - United People's Party - Japanese Communist Party.

Called the House of Representatives (衆議院, shūgiin), Japan’s lower house serves a role similar to Britain’s House of Commons. The House of Councilors (参議院, sangiin) is the upper house, and functions similarly to the Irish Seanad or the Canadian Senate.

The House of Councilors was created by Japan’s post-war Constitution. The party that controlled the lower house did not hold a majority in the upper house from Maywhen the House of Councillors was first established, until December Yoshida Shigeru, who served as prime minister during much of this time, was at great pains to augment his party’s strength in the upper house.

^ Table Persons Elected and Votes Polled by Political Parties - Ordinary Elections for the House of Councillors (–) Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications v t.

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Japan election data: the House of Representatives, [Steven R Reed] Japan election data. Ann Arbor: Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, (OCoLC) Material Type: "'An incredibly rich source book with a wealth of crucial district-level data-presented in great detail and with maximum clarity.

English: 20 April Japanese House of Councillors election results. LEGEND. Article of the Japanese Constitution provided that half of the councillors elected in the first House of Councillors election in would be up for re-election three years later in order to introduce staggered six-year terms.

The House initially had seats. Two seats were added to the House in after the agreement on the repatriation of Okinawa, increasing the House to a total of. The 25th regular election of members of the House of Councillors (dai-nijūgo-kai Sangiin giin tsūjō senkyo, 第25回参議院議員通常選挙) was held on 21 July to elect of the members of the House of Councillors, the upper house of the then member bicameral National Diet of Japan, for a term of six years.

House of Councillors elections were held in Japan on 7 Julyelecting half the seats in the House. The Liberal Democratic Party won the most seats.

Japanese House of Councillors election.

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to present. Ever since the adoption of the current constitution following World War II, the Diet has consisted of the House of Councillors and the House of Representatives. Members of both houses are now elected directly by the citizenry. The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia ().

It might be outdated or ideologically biased. House of Councillors (Sangi-in), the name of the upper house of the diet of Japan.

It is composed of deputies; deputies are elected under the majority system from 46 prefectural constituencies, and are elected from the nation at. The Diet, Japan's national parliament, is the highest organ of state power and the sole law-making organ of the state. The Diet comprises the seat House of Representatives (lower house) and the seat House of Councillors (upper house).

All Japanese citizens can vote in elections. General elections were held in Japan on 20 February The Rikken Minseitō, which was led by Prime Minister Osachi Hamaguchi, won an overall majority in the House of Representatives. Voter turnout was %.

Results. In Japan: Constitutional framework ultimately takes precedence over the House of Councillors (Sangiin), or upper house, in matters of passing legislation, controlling the budget, and approving treaties with foreign powers. Executive power is vested in the cabinet, which is organized and headed by the prime minister, though formally appointed by the House of Representatives.

Lower House Election: J From the Japan Times website. Upper House Vote '98 - special coverage of the July 12 elections from the Japan Times. Facts on Japan's Upper House Election - concise explanation of the Japanese electoral process and of the country's governmental structure.

From CNN. Electoral system []. The members of the House of Representatives were elected in single-member constituencies, 68 two-member constituencies and 11 three-member constituencies.

Voting was restricted to men aged over 25 who paid at least 3 yen a year in direct taxation. Campaign []. A total of candidates contested the elections, of which were from Kenseikai, from Seiyūhontō.

Diet, the national legislature of Japan. Under the Meiji Constitution ofthe Imperial Diet was established on the basis of two houses with coequal powers. The upper house, the House of Peers (Kizokuin), was almost wholly appointive.

Initially, its membership was slightly less thanbut it. Coverage of the election in the Japanese House of Councillors, the upper house of the Japanese Diet, included a roundtable discussion with Japan scholars on issues in Japanese.

A general election in Japan was held on 11 September for all seats of the House of Representatives of Japan, the lower house of the Diet of Japan, almost two years before the end of the term taken from the last election in Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi called the election after bills to privatize Japan Post were voted down in the upper house (which cannot be dissolved.

The anti-censorship campaign stance of Japan House of Councillors candidate Taro Yamada appears to have resonated strongly with his constituents, as it has been reported that Yamada has won his bid for election. List of Presidents of the House of Councillors (Japan) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

that a once elected councillor stays in the house at least six years. The election system of the sangiin will also be a topic of another video, where I’m going to explain the Japanese voting system in detail.

Novem The House of Councillors is the upper house of Japan’s National Diet and as such is part of the highest organ of state power and the sole law-making organ of the state, responsible for approving proposed legislation, budgets, and treaties as well as for general oversight of government operations as we work to ensure that the Japanese people.

The election will be held as the six-year term for half of the current upper house members will expire on July Due to electoral system reform in Julythe number of seats in the upper house will rise by six from to in two stages, with three of the six to be added this time to bring the total seats to